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OK, so I lied about the notebook cover.

A Kindle sleeve, which you could hopefully infer from the Kindle sitting on top of it.  Same burgundy oil-tanned leather, obviously, plus the pigskin lining.  I got a little fancy with this one, employing the small swing bag clasp (antique brass finish) which I purchased quite a while ago without the foggiest notion as to what I might do with it.  Antique brass rivets (small on the clasp, medium around the perimeter and on the back of the retention flap) finish out the hardware.

 

The Process (at least a few parts of it)

 

I’m a-gonna make sumfin.

There are some excellent brand marks on this piece of leather that I’m saving for something else; I haven’t figured out what just yet.  The portion I selected for this sleeve was relatively plain.

I pick a few likely pieces of leather and start marking for the pocket lining.

I did a basic saddle stitch from the center to each side (so two lengths of waxed thread starting in the middle) because I wasn’t certain just how wide it would be going. I ended up clipping the ends and tucking them underneath before gluing.

With the lining sewn on, I flip it over the lip of the pocket. I’ll flip the whole thing over, slather it in glue, and press carefully.  Some holes and “character” on the lining because it won’t show and is largely decorative, rather than protective.

I don’t think I’d glued it yet. Just getting a feel for how high it should sit, where the Kindle should ride, etc.

…and then let’s just skip a bunch of steps I didn’t photo. The flap turned out lovely, but the back of the rivets are slightly less so; I should have used double-headed rivets.

Overall, I’m pretty pleased (with a few minor caveats).  I thought ahead this time and decided on a closure before I put the lining in, so I could mount the clasp and then cover it up with the pigskin; it turned out well.  The lining lip turned out pretty well; the stitches are all beneath it.

A few minor caveats

The only things I would change, doing it again:

  • Double-headed rivets.  The back looks okay, but it could look fine. Also, you can’t see it, but several of them are rather off-center (flailing mallet syndrome); this is one of those times where a press would be ideal.
  • More careful measurements.  There’s a reason I have no pictures of my Kindle in the sleeve.  It doesn’t fit.

Learning experience.  I may drill out the rivets along each side and add some sort of spacing material.  I’d never try it with veg-tanned leather–you’d tear it up too much removing the rivets, I think–but the oil-tanned stretches and is pretty soft.  I’ve done it with individual rivets, though doing over a dozen is somewhat daunting.  I might just see if the damned thing will stretch a bit; you can get the Kindle into it, but it’s pretty rough on the hardware getting it out again.

And, of course, I still need to finish the edges.  But this is pretty, even if it’s not entirely suitable for its intended purpose.  Perhaps one of the newer generation Kindles is a little smaller?

 

 

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